A Bit of History

San Clemente Island goats were found on the San Clemente Island.  In the 1980’s, the Navy found all these special goats and were exterminating them. They would have been lost, were it not for some special people who were able to rescue a few and luckily we were able to save some breeding stock.  View history on these goats.  Its amazing that we have the San Clemente Island goats alive today. There are some very special photos of the history of the San Clement Island goats.  They are treasure, and can tell us so much about these goats; where they came from, what they are like, etc.

Bloodlines

Foundation Bloodlines who rescued San Clemente Island Goats

Thanks Laurel and others for sharing this Foundation Bloodline  information.  We will have more on this hopefully soon.

USA

Nellie Gail * New Hampshire * Tepper * Rivetti * Ahrensberg * Earth Spirit * Plimouth

Canada

Gil (Incorparates some Blake) and Vancouver Island

So what is a bloodline?

According to Phillip Sponenberg, DVM, PhD, a Bloodline is a sub-group of a breed, and often is isolated from others for several generations.  Its often associated with farms and breeders.  Managing bloodlines is vital to preserving a breed.  As quoted from Managing Breeds for a Secure Future” Second Edition by Phillip Sponenberg, DVM, PhD.

Bloodlines, varieties and strains are all subgroups within a breed, and often are important reservoirs of variation and genetic diversity.  While definitions vary, each of these terms usually designates a subpopulation that has been isolated from the others for several generations (usually four or more) with the consequence that they are somewhat genetically distinct from the other bloodlines.  Bloodlines are usually linked to certain breeders or farms, and can be distinct historically and genetically. The link of bloodlines to breeders is a reflection not only of their genetic isolation, but also of the selection practices of that individual breeder” p. 51

“Managing the bloodlines, strains and varieties within a breed is important for long-term maintenance of the genetic variability that is crucial in breed viability.”  p. 54

Thanks Laurel for sharing this.

Some pictures of San Clemente Island Goats

If you would like to share photos for breed representation, colors of the breed, or for your own pedigrees, please let us know.  igscrsci@gmail.com

Photos below courtesy of Mack Brin Farms

 

3 Comments

  1. Is there a working registry for these goats?

    1. Author

      Absolutely. We are alive and working hard on the SCI. We are the registry for the breed and have been since they came off the island.

      sorry. I just saw your question.

      We also are putting in a Board of Advisors for the breed too,to aid, suggest etc the breed, owners and breeders. We are working on getting an online searchable database also for the breed.

      Peggy

      Peggy

    2. Author

      This is weird. I just replied but not sure if it went through. I don’t see my reply back to you, so I will reply again.

      I just barely saw your question. So sorry. Sharon, you may email me at idgrfiber@gmail.com

      Are you an SCI breeder/owners?

      Yes, we are the registry for the SCI and have been from the very beginning. We are just starting to take on a small Board of Advisors too for the breed, so that we can have gain fresh insight and ideas, suggestions etc.

      We are alive and well and have developed fresh new ways of doing the registrations, so that it better serves the SCI community. SCI are in a state of Conservation and many herds have little to know records. Ohters are fully registered. WE have developed a way to hand all these types. Its through a small system of special herd books that is similar to how the Livestock Conservancy does registrations on other Conservatiion/Heritage breeds. We work closely with them too.

      We’re in the process of getting our online searchable database online, which we believe will be very powerful.

      Thanks for reaching out Looking forward to working with and hearing from you,
      Peggy

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